1970s

Change comes slowly, but it comes.

The Angus Bowmer Theatre was dedicated on March 21, 1970 with a production of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, and the first season of spring plays, called Festival/STAGE II, opened for a six-week run. Daily matinees were also introduced. In 1971 Angus Bowmer retired, and Jerry Turner became our second Producing Director. The 1973 production of Othello marked the first time an African-American actor played the role of Othello here. OSF’s first female director, Margaret Booker, helmed the 1974 production of Hedda Gabler. In 1977 OSF opened the Black Swan as a space for more experimental productions. The first production was A Taste of Honey. In 1978 the Festival completed the canon for the second time, and Richard L. Hay completed the canon for the first time, with Timon of Athens. The Festival continued to break attendance records throughout the decade.

During this decade, the Festival produced three world premieres, including adaptations: 1978 - Miss Julie, 1979 - Root of the Mandrake, 1979 – The Wild Duck.

1970s Production History